Will Rishi Sunak break the glass ceiling? – The New Indian Express

Britain’s rising political star, Rishi Sunak, has won the first two rounds of voting in the race to become the country’s prime minister. The contest narrows down to him and Commerce Secretary Penny Mordaunt. Foreign Secretary Liz Truss is still on their heels. This first vote reflects the preference of members belonging to the Conservative Party. His real test, however, would be the final showdown with Mordaunt in the party vote. Once the list of candidates for the post of Prime Minister is reduced to two, the paying members of the rank and file of the Conservative Party will vote last to select one of the two shortlisted candidates for the post of Prime Minister.

It was here that Sunak would face the burden of history. British voters, mostly white, have never chosen a non-white as prime minister. Most of the nearly two lakh conservative rank and file members are conservative and white males and over the age of sixty. Opinion polls among them put Mordaunt ahead of Sunak although the latter enjoys the support of many party MPs.

The majority of conservative members belong to the right. Boris Johnson stormed to power in 2019 on the wave of English nationalism with the slogan ‘Get Brexit Done’. In the last vote, he had 66% support from rank-and-file members and his rival Jeremy Hunt just over 33%. Hunt has now cast his spell behind Rishi. But Johnson still enjoys considerable support among party members. Sunak played smart by refusing to criticize Johnson at his first campaign event, even describing him as the “most remarkable person” he had met.

The gesture was intended to appease Johnson’s supporters among party members who blame him for triggering the prime minister’s resignation. Sunak’s bold gamble to step down as Chancellor of the Exchequer on the side of integrity and transparency won him huge support among his party’s MPs. But will the tactic also impress rank-and-file party members, that is the question.

Britain’s rising political star, Rishi Sunak, has won the first two rounds of voting in the race to become the country’s prime minister. The contest narrows down to him and Commerce Secretary Penny Mordaunt. Foreign Secretary Liz Truss is still on their heels. This first vote reflects the preference of members belonging to the Conservative Party. His real test, however, would be the final showdown with Mordaunt in the party vote. Once the list of candidates for the post of Prime Minister is reduced to two, the paying members of the rank and file of the Conservative Party will vote last to select one of the two shortlisted candidates for the post of Prime Minister. It was here that Sunak would face the burden of history. British voters, mostly white, have never chosen a non-white as prime minister. Most of the nearly two lakh Tory rank and file are conservative, white men in their sixties. Opinion polls among them put Mordaunt ahead of Sunak although the latter enjoys the support of many party MPs. The majority of conservative members belong to the right. Boris Johnson stormed to power in 2019 on the wave of English nationalism with the slogan ‘Get Brexit Done’. In the last vote, he had 66% support from rank-and-file members and his rival Jeremy Hunt just over 33%. Hunt has now cast his spell behind Rishi. But Johnson still enjoys considerable support among party members. Sunak played smart by refusing to criticize Johnson at his first campaign event, even describing him as the “most remarkable person” he had met. The gesture was intended to appease Johnson’s supporters among party members who blame him for triggering the prime minister’s resignation. Sunak’s bold gamble to step down as Chancellor of the Exchequer on the side of integrity and transparency won him huge support among his party’s MPs. But will the tactic also impress rank-and-file party members, that is the question.

About Julius Southworth

Check Also

EDITO: The shortage of chickpeas is a sign of the times

Content of the article Economic turbulence will get worse before it gets better. Warnings of …