Rozgar Mela admits India’s jobs crisis – The New Indian Express

Lack of employment opportunities is a serious problem in India. The recent government initiative Rozgar Mela, which promises to provide 10 lakh jobs, is an oblique admission of this situation. The Rozgar Mela launched by the Prime Minister promises 10 lakh jobs, which we are not quite sure yet. Some of them will be government jobs, it seems. Of course, the central government may be going on a hiring spree, as it recently admitted that around 10 lakh positions in various central government departments were vacant. The Rozgar Mela will most likely see BJP-led states also participate and fill some vacancies in state departments. The government has remained in denial mode for a long time on the issue of employment and the quality of jobs. When asked this question, he continued to claim that start-ups and the gig economy create millions of jobs. This assertion has been contradicted by various employment surveys, both in the public and private sectors.

The riots earlier this year in various parts of UP and Bihar – where aspirants to railway jobs have been on a rampage over changes in the exam pattern – and the recent scenes at the UP exams PET, for which 37 lakh aspirants had applied for a handful of jobs, shows a different picture than the government has tried to paint.

Yes, start-ups create jobs, but many of them have disrupted existing businesses, rendering several old business establishments redundant. So many people who used to work elsewhere are joining the now famous gig economy. CMIE data in October again shows unemployment rate
is gradually approaching 8% after falling below 6.43% in September 2022. Rural unemployment above 8% suggests that non-farm employment is even fewer and far between. Over the past year, the unemployment rate has been above 7% in eight of the past 12 months. The government’s own periodic labor force data suggests labor force participation has been consistently below 50% for some time.

More worrying is the fact that India’s long-term growth prospects don’t look as bright as some would have you believe. More and more analysts and economists now see 6-6.5% in the long term, rather than 7%. A decade ago, analysts and economic commentators said that if India had growth below 8%, it would be a demographic catastrophe. Let’s hope that we are not faced with a demographic shock.

Lack of employment opportunities is a serious problem in India. The recent government initiative Rozgar Mela, which promises to provide 10 lakh jobs, is an oblique admission of this situation. The Rozgar Mela launched by the Prime Minister promises 10 lakh jobs, which we are not quite sure yet. Some of them will be government jobs, it seems. Of course, the central government may be going on a hiring spree, as it recently admitted that around 10 lakh positions in various central government departments were vacant. The Rozgar Mela will most likely see BJP-led states also participate and fill some vacancies in state departments. The government has remained in denial mode for a long time on the issue of employment and the quality of jobs. When asked this question, he continued to claim that start-ups and the gig economy create millions of jobs. This assertion has been contradicted by various employment surveys, both in the public and private sectors. The riots earlier this year in various parts of UP and Bihar – where aspirants to railway jobs have been on a rampage over changes in the exam pattern – and the recent scenes at the UP exams PET, for which 37 lakh aspirants had applied for a handful of jobs, shows a different picture than the government has tried to paint. Yes, start-ups create jobs, but many of them have disrupted existing businesses, rendering several old business establishments redundant. So many people who used to work elsewhere are joining the now famous gig economy. CMIE data for October shows the unemployment rate is again approaching 8% after falling below 6.43% in September 2022. Rural unemployment above 8% suggests that non-farm employment is even less many and far between. Over the past year, the unemployment rate has been above 7% in eight of the past 12 months. The government’s own periodic labor force data suggests that labor force participation has been consistently below 50% for some time. More worrying is the fact that India’s long-term growth prospects don’t look as bright as some would have you believe. More and more analysts and economists now see 6-6.5% in the long term, rather than 7%. A decade ago, analysts and economic commentators were saying that if India had growth below 8%, it would be a demographic disaster. Let’s hope that we are not faced with a demographic shock.

About Julius Southworth

Check Also

Full cob report required | Otago Daily Times News Online

Those who feel a groan every time Dunedin Mayor Jules Radich mentions his pet project, …