Izmir Agricultural Development Center – Sasalı Biolab / Mert Uslu Architecture


Izmir Agricultural Development Center – Sasalı Biolab / Mert Uslu Architecture

© Zm Yasa Architecture photography© Zm Yasa Architecture photography© Zm Yasa Architecture photography© Zm Yasa Architecture photography+ 40

© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography

Text description provided by the architects. Shaped by the hand of man, the deformations undergone in the natural environment transform today’s living conditions. Therefore, it has become necessary to develop new strategies and techniques related to life support activities (such as nutrition and housing) that can adapt to these transformations. Undoubtedly, the negative and positive effects of such technological developments on a need that is emerging on a global scale are quite high. At this point, it might not be wrong to compare these technological developments to a medallion with a negative and a positive face.

© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
Plan
Plan
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
Section
Section
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography

While it is clear that the rapid technological developments experienced after the 2000s have had a negative effect on the natural environment, it is evident that solutions to these problems are still sought through technology. For this reason, how and to what extent the daily increase in the overall dimensions of these environmental deformations will affect viability (life) in the world is now the subject of much study. This research should produce alternative solutions to environmental problems such as global warming, climate change and drought, and degradation of soil quality. The project, which is expected to be located in Sasalı in Çiğli district of Izmir, is designed with education and production as the main objective. As part of this project, agricultural fields applied in normal and intelligent soils, high-level plantation agricultural fields, greenhouses, an eco-market, a multipurpose room, training courses, administrative premises, laboratories, a library, technical services, and volume areas were created. By maintaining the spatial volumes in a linear fashion, the bioswale (bio-boulevard) and the axis of circulation which is attached to it, emerge as the backbone of the design.

© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography

This basic design structure allows users to learn and experience the operational mechanisms of the institute while visiting the region. Entrance to the area along the north-south axis is planned from the north axis. Starting from the main entrance, the backbone of circulation brings visitors / users first to educational spaces (such as laboratories and libraries). The educational spaces and the spaces of agricultural activities (like greenhouses and vertical gardens) diverge from each other with the creation of the Eco bazaar which is generated by the expansion of the backbone of the circulation. The fields of agricultural activities that lie beyond the Eco bazaar area invite users to observe and experiment with different agricultural techniques. The construction of the backbone design ends with normal and intelligent agricultural fields applied to the ground located at the southern end of the site.

© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
Diagram
Diagram
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography
© Zm Yasa Architecture photography


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